ADDitude Magazine Article - ADHD Spectrum Disorder

RECOMMENDED READING: ADHD Spectrum Disorder

https://www.additudemag.com/adhd-is-spectrum-disorder/

 

The article is engaging and encouraging in the sense that more advancements are being made in ADHD research. Yet I don’t see ADHD as a “disorder” at all - if anything, it’s a transorder or a paraorder. The ADHD brain can think beyond what a neurotypical brain thinks in the same amount of time.  It can also think beside neurotypical thoughts, outside of the regular realm of ideas.

The nerd in me loves this type of article. Of course we all want to know what causes ADHD and it’s great to understand the neuroscience behind it. Whenever I see words like “frontal lobe” “neurotransmitters” and “amygdala” my heart starts to pitter pat. We all have moments of “Why me?!” We want to know what could have been done to prevent it, cure it and control it. By now, we all know that there are general lifestyle changes that can alleviate ADHD symptoms, such as diet, exercise, mindfulness practice, spending time in nature and managing screen time. While this article doesn’t provide anything new in terms of practical advice, it does provide a bit of insight into what might be going on in the brain during certain ADHD moments.

All of my clients are unique individuals with different challenges. Some struggle most with inattention, others with impulsivity and yet others with emotional control. Every client finds a unique strategy that they enjoy using so that it becomes a habitual go-to technique. These skills and structures make their daily lives easier and more fun. All of my clients like to know what’s going on inside their brain. “Yes! There’s a scientific explanation!” While it’s not an excuse for certain behaviors, it does alleviate the self-blame and shame associated with ADHD.

Living with ADHD does not mean a lifelong crusade to eliminate its symptoms. In fact, I encourage my clients to not only accept but embrace the positive attributes of their brains. For example, some ADHD symptoms may be disruptive in an academic setting but beneficial in an emergency situation. It doesn’t matter how your brain is wired as long as you can use it wisely to your best advantage. Go, Turbo Thinkers!